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A definitive timeline of Julia Fox’s (ex Dominatrix) greatest moments

BDSM Media News Posted on Sun, April 17, 2022 03:29:17

Sourve: Theface.com.

USA – It’s time to make official what many of us already know to be true: that the ex-dominatrix, artist, photographer and actress is one of pop culture’s most fascinating figures – and a riotous paragon of celebrity.

See a lot more and bigger photo’s and video’s on: Theface.com.

As the old saying goes: ​“a cat has nine lives; for three he plays, for three he strays and for the last three he stays.” This feels like a proverb self-professed ​“New York classic”, muse du jour and multi-hyphenate Julia Fox has so far modelled her own life on, having packed more into her 32 years on Earth than many of us will in an entire lifetime.

Born in Milan, Fox’s early childhood was largely spent in Italy with her grandfather. Then she moved to New York City aged six and quickly claimed the Big Apple for her own. She started clubbing at 14 and, by her own admission, has been fired from every day-job she’s ever had. Since then, Fox has been a regular fixture of NYC’s art scene, carving out a reputation as the ultimate good-time girl with an everything-but-carefully-cultivated public image. And that’s just how she likes it – even though she’s now a bit sick and tired of the club.

Although she broke into the mainstream after starring in the Safdie brothers’ 2019 hit film Uncut Gems, Fox further tumbled into the collective consciousness with a serious bang back in January, as one half of the most talked-about romance in recent memory (who could forget that legendary diary entry, published via Interview magazine, detailing her and Kanye West’s whirlwind date night?).

While some may have dismissed Fox as nothing more than Ye’s rebound, following his messy breakup with Kim Kardashian, make no mistake: she’s so much more than a bit of arm candy. Fox is an artist, a photographer and ex-dominatrix who lives and breathes her chaotic craft. Right now, it feels like she’s the only celebrity who’s celebrity-ing properly, from her viral DIY denim get-ups and dramatically smudged eyeliner to legendary one-liners and one truly mesmerising TikTok rendition of Lana Del Rey’s Video Games. She’s giving us drama, theatrics and looks aplenty. Most of all, she’s giving us something to bloody talk about, all while being a single mum.

Undeterred by the often cutting court of public opinion, Fox ploughs on in her pursuit of self-expression, no matter what shape that might take. For now, it looks as though she’s working on a memoir, which is as yet unfinished but promises to be ​“a masterpiece”. And so, to celebrate one of the most fascinating celebs of our time, behold: a timeline of Julia Fox’s greatest moments.

April 2014

The launch of Franziska Fox

23-year-old Fox makes one of her first forays into fashion with this luxury knitwear brand, created in collaboration with her best friend Briana Andalore. Fox and Andalore hit it off at a party, during a time when Fox took her pet cat everywhere… Even parties. She channelled the spirit of her dominatrix alter-ego Mistress Valentina into Franziska Fox, telling Elle: ​“I really wished to propose a novel concept for knitwear, a form of dressing that I am most passionate about, and also to have a collection that is unafraid within today’s fashion landscape, in regards to the female form and intellect.” Given Franziska Fox’s Instagram page is no longer available, the brand is most likely defunct by now.

November 2015

The Playboy feature

Fox was photographed by Greg Manis in what would become known as the magazine’s last-ever nude issue. How’s that for impact? It’s almost impossible to find images from this shoot without artist Michael De Feo’s sweet flowers painted on top, but the originals can still probably be uncovered in some dark corner of Reddit.

October 2015

The publication of Heartburn/​Nausea

Fox’s first book is provocative, autobiographical and positively Larry Clark-esque. It’s filled with collected artefacts from Fox’s life, such as polaroids, iMessage screenshots, fun facts and plenty of nudes, all of which are used to make sense of experiencing three abusive relationships. Now, it’s reached cult status in the world of underground zines, with people flogging it online for serious cash. ​“The message is that it’s OK to be fucked up. It’s OK to have a past. And more importantly, it’s okay to show your vulnerability and your weaknesses,” Fox told writer Rose Holtermann about the book’s making-of.

May 2016

The publication of PTSD

At this point, Fox was no stranger to living life on the edge at any given time. Her second photobook captured ​“an all-consuming six-month love affair with a sadomasochistic prostitute named John” – AKA John Holland, a member of Salem, the polarising witch house electro-rock band (yes, really). PTSD is as NSFW as it gets, featuring nose bleeds and needles alongside evocative landscapes, like a bonfire burning at dusk or a statue looking up towards a cloudless blue sky. The whole thing was a product of six months spent deep in Louisiana bayous, an experience she later recreated in an exhibition at Magic Gallery in New York. ​“I just love feeling things. I usually know when something is going to end up being catastrophic but I don’t really care,” Fox said. ​“I find that the things that end up being earth-shattering are the things that give me the most thrill.”

March 2017

The debut exhibition, R.I.P. Julia Fox

As you can probably guess by the title, Fox heavily flirted with themes of death for her debut solo art show in New York, which was inspired by a near-death overdose she experienced at just 17. Curated in collaboration with her longtime friend Richie Shazam, it also explores eroticism, fetish, and how these themes relate to rituals and sacrifices. Naturally, a key part of the exhibition was Fox smearing her own blood on silk canvases (she extracted it with a syringe). ​“It wasn’t as bad as it seems,” she told HuffPost. We’ll take her word for it.

November 2019

The Barbie photoshoot with Pete Davidson

Do magazine photoshoots hold potential to predict the future? Looking back on Fox’s 2019 shoot with Pete Davidson for Paper, we’d reckon so. Dressed up as a plastic fantastic Barbie and Ken, this seemingly random pairing hinged on the fact that Fox was about to launch her acting career in Uncut Gems, which was produced ​“by one of Pete’s good friends”, Sebastian Bear-McClard. It made for a striking set of images, as a dolled-up Fox cradled Davidson’s head on her lap. But no one could have foreseen the tabloid chaos the pair would ignite two years later, when they became the new love interests… for the recently split Kimye.

December 2019

The feature film debut in Uncut Gems

Fox played red-hot jewellery shop assistant Julia in the Safdie Brothers’ restless, unbearably tense film, arguably launching her mainstream career as an actress to be taken seriously. The role was written for her: ​“they’d been talking to me about this role for five years or something,” she told THE FACE. ​“Always telling me how perfect I am for it, and every few months they would send me an updated script, or ask me if I had any input in developing the character. I didn’t realise the magnitude of Uncut Gems at the time. I just thought:​‘Oh, an indie movie that my friends are making.’” And the rest was history.

February 2021

The directorial debut with Fantasy Girls

The ultimate New York multi-hyphenate, if you think Fox would be content with simply starring in Netflix blockbusters, publishing books and posing for Playboy, you’re obviously completely wrong. ​“I have one short film under my belt, which we just submitted to festivals,” she told Paper in 2021. Don’t we all, eh? Said film was Fantasy Girls, which Fox wrote and directed, telling the tale of a group of teenage girls who get caught up in a Reno, Nevada trafficking ring. Inspiration struck when she visited the city with no plan in place other than knowing that she wanted to make a film. ​“And then I met all these young girls between the ages of 13 – 15 and I knew they were stars,” she explained. ​“After speaking with the guardians, I found out how child sex trafficking and kidnappings are so frequent there that they don’t even report them anymore, so I knew that I could draw attention to this cause I’m passionate about.” You can catch it on MUBI after you’ve de-stressed from rewatching Uncut Gems.

January 2022

The Kanye West fling

​“I met Ye in Miami on New Year’s Eve and it was an instant connection,” began Fox’s self-authored account of her blossoming relationship with Kanye West for Interview, which was perhaps the boldest and most provocative way to announce a hook up in recent memory. Titled ​“Date Night”, the piece detailed how they’d met at his surprise gig in Miami and got along so well that they decided to fly to New York to watch Slave Play. Then Ye apparently directed a photoshoot for Fox in the ritzy Italian restaurant Carbone, after which he gifted her a whole new wardrobe. ​“It felt like a real Cinderella moment,” she gushed. After that, the pair were inseparable, shutting down fashion week in skin-tight leather and keeping us gossips busy.

February 2022

… And the break up


​“All good things must come to an end,” said, er, lots of people over the course of history and, alas, Fox and West’s relationship did not escape fate. After days (or weeks? It was all such a blur…) of rumours, Fox confirmed that the pair had split on Instagram stories, hitting back at a Daily Mail article that claimed she was ​“tearful” after the break up. ​“I have love for him but I wasn’t w the man,” she wrote. ​“Jesus Christ, what do you guys think I am, 12 years old?” Then to top it all off, Fox claimed that she hasn’t cried ​“since 1997”, so… when she was seven. Hard as nails, our Julia.

In a later interview with The Cut, Fox went on to explain that she was actually doing us all a service by flaunting her relationship with Ye so publicly. ​“Celebrities are not that fucking important. You can tell us about your stupid fucking date,” she said. ​“We’re in a pandemic. Give people something to talk about. Do your fucking service, do your job.” Finally, someone who understands the assignment.

February 2022

The ​“Uncuh Jaaahms” moment

Moving on swiftly, Fox went on the Call Her Daddy podcast to chat… actually, we can’t remember. Anything that was said on the podcast was epicly eclipsed by a short snippet that went viral, in which Fox compares being Kanye’s muse to being Josh Safdie’s muse on Uncut Gems. But no one with a TikTok account says Uncut Gems anymore. Thanks to Fox’s insane vocal fry, which she later put down to being stoned during the interview, the new official way to pronounce the film’s title is Uncuh Jaaahms. We don’t make the rules, Julia does.

March 2022

The ​“masterpiece” book announcement

The latest viral moment that Fox has gifted us occurred at last week’s Oscars, where she let us all know that she’s working on another book. What’s it about? Wouldn’t you like to know, nosey. ​“I don’t want to give too much of it away, because I’m very superstitious so I don’t like to speak of things before they’re finished,” she told the red carpet interviewer. What we do know is that ​“it’s so far a masterpiece,” according to Fox herself. And the book’s concept is apparently ever-changing. ​“It was a memoir at first, but now it’s just like my first book, you know?” she said. New York Times bestseller incoming…



‘Uncut Gems’ Breakout Julia Fox Is Ready to Infuse Art With Activism

BDSM Media News Posted on Sat, February 08, 2020 01:07:15

Source: Hollywoodreporter.com.

USA – The actress is a new name to many in Hollywood, but she’s walked a long and winding path (as a dominatrix, painter, poet, clothing designer and photographer) to her overnight success: “You have to use your pain as a gift.”

Julia Fox just caused a car accident.

It was an hour ago, somewhere in Hollywood, about a mile from where she’s standing on this late November Friday night in front of a charming watering hole called The Broadwater Plunge on L.A.’s divey theater row. A freshly lit cigarette in one hand, cellphone in the other, Fox delivers the fender-bender details like a lunch order.

She was posing next to a freeway for a magazine shoot (Carine Roitfeld’s CR Fashion Book) when she saw a male driver unable to avert his gaze from her. “It was crazy traffic, and I was wearing the Gucci with all these slits up here,” she says, waving a hand — the one with the cigarette — in front of her chest, which is now covered in a black Cactus Jack hoodie. She takes a drag and exhales. “He couldn’t stop staring and just slammed into another car.”

That driver isn’t the only one who’s been unable to take his eyes off Fox as of late. The 29-year-old took on her first acting job in Josh and Benny Safdie’s two-hour adrenaline rush, Uncut Gems, playing a jewelry store employee and girlfriend of Howard Ratner, a gambling addict played by Adam Sandler. After the film’s TIFF world premiere, she earned buzz for her portrayal of his rough-around-the-edges mistress, signed with WME and, in October, earned a Gotham Award nom for breakout actor. The role has given her a shot at a Hollywood career, one she hopes will include more acting and, later, producing, directing and, somehow, a way to further infuse art with activism. From any other ingenue, the latter sounds like a publicist talking point — but not from her.

Fox lived many lives before making her way to the big screen, and this corner booth inside the bar where she sips a Coke and recaps the journey. She’s been a New York City teenage troublemaker, It girl, muse, club kid turned club owner, poet, author, artist, photographer, painter, provocateur, domestic violence survivor, a Page Six headline-maker and someone who has raised her voice to say #MeToo. (In 2017, she accused notable artist and photographer Chuck Close of lewd conduct during a 2013 shoot. He later apologized.)

“I’m always changing. I’m always evolving. I’m always growing,” says Fox. “I want to explore myself in every facet. I don’t ever want to limit myself based on what other people have told me I am.”

Born in Milan to an Italian mother and American father, Fox’s early years were spent living with her grandfather near Milan because of her parents’ strained relationship. Her father, meanwhile, was “living in New York, like, figuring it out, trying to get an apartment and living on a boat.” When he landed a construction job and signed a lease, Fox left Italy to live full-time in Yorkville, a posh neighborhood on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. “It was just a total 180 from what I was used to. My family is Italian, traditional Catholic, and suddenly I was living with a crazy man in New York.”

To confirm the use of that particular adjective, Fox tells the following story: “The first thing my dad did when I got to New York was walk me to the corner and point to the street sign. He was like, ‘OK, this is where you live. If anything happens, this is where you live.’ Then he kind of just sent me off in the world, and I had to figure it out from there.”

That’s what she’s been doing ever since, albeit with many twists and turns. Fox says she never applied herself in school and got mixed up with friends who were drinking, drugging and clubbing in the way that city kids sometimes do. She has talked openly of surviving an overdose at 17. “It’s kind of a miracle that I’m OK because a lot of the people I grew up with aren’t doing so well. They’re still on drugs or in jail. A lot of them died.”

She credits a solid work ethic as one of the keys to getting out alive. “My dad didn’t give me money, so I always had to work.” She started off at a shoe store on 86th Street called Orva, in the hosiery department because nobody went there. “That’s where they put me because I was too incapable of doing anything,” she says. She worked in an ice cream shop and pastry shop. “Then I got into the sex industry pretty young, doing S&M stuff.”

Officially, the job title was “dominatrix.” Fox, who was in high school at the time, says it’s not as shocking as it sounds. “I had heard about another girl who was doing it and that there was no sex and no nudity. It was all role-playing, and I was like, ‘I can do that. I can act. I can put on an outfit,’ you know? I did it, and it was great. I really credit it when people ask me, ‘Oh, have you ever acted before?’ “

The money was so good, she says — “Suddenly I could get my own apartment, pay all my own bills” — that it made up for the clientele. “They were all weird but nice,” she explains. “Like, submissive men who all had issues. Toward the end, I was like, ‘Dude, just go get therapy and stop coming here.’ “

She took her own advice and quit after a six-month stint to settle down with a boyfriend in a relationship that lasted six years. During that time, she partnered with friend Briana Andalore to launch a successful women’s clothing line, Franziska Fox, until she outgrew that business and segued to a series of provocative art projects using trauma as inspiration.

She self-published back-to-back books — Symptomatic of a Relationship Gone Sour: Heartburn/Nausea, published in 2015, and 2016’s PTSD — and hosted the art exhibit “R.I.P. Julia Fox,” with some of the work featuring paintings colored with her own blood. Combined, the projects provided intimate, unflinching looks at drug use, domestic violence, sex, mental illness and dominatrix work. “I’m so proud as a person, so to make myself vulnerable was hard, but it felt freeing and cathartic. I was living my truth,” she says, singling out the abuse she suffered in one of her relationships as hardest to reveal. “You have to use your pain as your gift. If you’re able to take something really negative and repackage it as something positive, you’ve nailed it.”

Josh Safdie noticed that quality when he caught a glimpse of Fox, first on the now-defunct social site Vine, and later when she walked by West Village restaurant Jack’s Wife Freda, where he was sitting on the patio with producer Sebastian Bear-McClard. “When you think you know her, you see another facet of her,” he says. “She’s like an uncut gem, really. The more you dig, the more beauty you see.”

The filmmaker, who had been developing Uncut Gems for five years before that chance meeting, saw more than 200 actresses for the role. Fox says she’d heard they included such stars as Lady Gaga, Kim Kardashian, Scarlett Johansson and Jennifer Lawrence, but never confirmed with Josh because “I didn’t want to drive myself crazy.”

What she does know is that “when the studios got involved and a lot of money was being poured into the project, they wanted a big-name lead actress.” She also had to prove to producer Scott Rudin that she could actually act. After Sandler was cast, she did a screen test with him in Barneys New York, the now-bankrupt department store. “The chemistry was so undeniable that I think that when Scott saw the tape, he was like, ‘OK, I get it.’ “

Fox threw herself into the role as much as she did any of her other projects, even going method for a scene in which her character stays up all night. “She looked beat, and I don’t think she realized that we’d be shooting the same scene all day long. So like an hour or two in, she said, ‘Oh my God, am I tired,’ ” Sandler recalls, laughing. “She was incredible. Very instinctive, and she played everything so real. I never knew what the heck would happen.

Fox isn’t sure where her next chapter will take her, but she’s leaning toward moving to L.A. to be closer to the industry. She’s inspired by Margot Robbie, who broke out in The Wolf of Wall Street before becoming a formidable producer. Like Robbie, Fox also recently married but is mostly private about it. (“He’s kind of my rock — he’s so unfazed and doesn’t care who I am. To him, I’m Julia,” she says of husband Peter Artemiev, who works in aviation, according to The New York Times.)

Just when you think you have a handle on her story, Fox says something else about her past, and it makes you think there’s something to what Josh Safdie believes. When you think you know her, another layer is unearthed, like an uncut gem. “I really have to stay focused and on the straight and narrow to avoid certain people and any type of trigger,” Fox says about the possibility of moving to another city. “That lifestyle still lingers, and that’s kind of why I want to get out of New York. Just to leave it all behind and not be reminded of anything so I can start fresh. Every time I’ve run away, it was like I was running toward something.”

She’s sure Hollywood is what she’s running toward now, but unlike that man in the car, she’s keeping her eyes on the road. “I always knew there was more for me — I just didn’t know if I could access it.”

See more and larger photo’s on: Hollywoodreporter.com.